22 Oct, 2017  |  Written by  |  under Drag Racing, Motorsports

The ripple effect of the Houston Hurricane savagery found me stepping to help Rob Geiger at Geiger Media Global whose home and business were flooded out. This meant I went to the races watching not through my usual photog lens and storyteller hunter, but with the perspective of a PR person, guided by Geiger’s very specific agenda that would ensure his clients would not experience any interruption in service. Know this: I have much deeper understanding and consequential respect for how hard the public relations folks labor during a NHRA National event.

While the “mission” was highly entertaining and educational, I was whipped after all 3 days keeping up with how four classes unfolded for five clients: Erica Enders-Stevens, Hector Arana, Jr., Mike Coughlin, Troy Coughlin and Jeg Coughlin, Jr. I should point out that while 2 racer’s pit were blessedly adjacent, the others were spread out over a few acres. With a sellout crowd, I was not going to attempt driving my manual shift credentialed sports car through the throng, and no golf carts were available so hoofing was the order of the day.  Mike Coughlin’s pit was all the way over on the Indy Car oval track which meant a circuitous one-mile “there and back again” trip. You quickly learn how to hitchhike with strangers.

This was also my deep water plunge into using a stinking cell phone for images of rapidly unfolding events as well as a voice recorder to conduct up-to-minute interviews for quick quotes that GMG would process and post from Texas. I was clueless about the recording bits on the Galaxy 8 and abhorred the idea of photos with a phone, but I became very proficient with both in about 24 hours.

Can you say “Old dog, new tricks?” yep. that’s me.

The eye-popping cognition was stumbling onto “burst mode”. The accidental wrong button push revealed the 3 x 6 x 1/4 inch handheld device was capable of capturing upwards of 65  images for any car, bike or digger that burnt out or launched off the line. All in focus. It was disgusting as it was delightful to learn. All I could think of was the tidal wave of obsolescence heading towards my vast investment in  Nikons and Hassleblads. . . .  I can’t wait to see what my new camera drone will teach me, or if it gets me arrested.

Have visual chew on the ones of Chris Karamesines, “The Golden Greek” that I captured like a Panavision Jedi operator using nothing but my index finger. Insert expletive. In 45 frames I have the full visual story of how one precisely and completely burns down a a perfectly good top fuel engines in under 200 feet. Just watching the zoomies imparts the unfolding, unavoidable mechanical doom. I call the series: “Golden Greek Top Fuel Saganaki Aluminum Style”

All the images you see here are fancy pants phone shots, some are digitally manipulated – on the stinking phone of course. Yo! Adobe! Your turn is coming.

Click on any image for a “bigger” view.

Troy Coughlin burnout

Oh, please Troy, win this round. . .

Moment of truth

Jeg the Junior

Fearsome tire-hoppin display

TJ & Fast Jack take Terry with them

JFR Prez R. Hight: Man on a Mission

If  J Force has an AARP card Alexis doesn’t care!

Arana Sr sends Jr. down the track

What’s up with Eddie?

Jr. knows how to smoke ’em.

Greg’s chasin’ Jason

Bad Ass Pro Stock Driver Erica Enders-Stevens

So Ready. So Steady

Burn It Up Girl!

Golden Greek Saganaki Aluminum Style – “LandSpeed” Louise Ann Noeth succumbs to shooting with a smarty pants phone at Gateway Motorsports Park during NHRA Midwest Nationals.

Some see a tail section, I see marvel at its artistry.

This coming Saturday, not only will another winner snag points in the IndyCar series, but Gateway Motorsports Park will make its public mark as a viable, safe high-speed banked oval in the United States. Owner Curtis Francois doled out a bundle to repair and resurface the track to attract the series. It is money well spent.

Graham Rahal exits the pits

The once derelict facility has risen to first class prominence with the ability to host a NHRA Drag Racing National event, NASCAR Truck Racing and now the IndyCar Series – all in little over 5 years.

As a motorsports photojournalist for the past 30 years it is very rare in the USA to see this level of competence. There have been plenty of new tracks that burst onto the scene with big boastful claims, yet few blossom while burning through wads of investors cash and begging concessions for the local governments. Francois has kept his head down and worked diligently to shape this facility into a first-class facility. All the pros I talk to privately are impressed with the place, its operation and the evocative community vibe that resonates.

Hinch looks for any speed inch

Hello Castroneves has told me where he expects to see a lot of lead-changing passing for Saturday’s race and since he won the last Indy race at Gateway 14 years ago, I’m inclined to think he is not pulling my leg.

Here’s a look at what I saw, what turned my head and I expect more to come. Click on an image for a bigger look. Soak it up.   – LandSpeed Louise

Balancing the car requires a tedious, deliberate march of measurements taken , tweaked and rechecked all around the car.

All Rights Reserved. Copyright 2017 Louise Ann Noeth. Images contain digital, traceable watermark and all infringements will be legally, vigorously resolved.

Tony Kanaan enter Turn 1

The “‘stones” of speed

How hot is it  Tony?

Rahal feels out the GMP racing surface prior to upgrades

Sometimes parts are obstinate.

Car is ready. Driver Ready. Team Ready. So it starts to rain.

Harvey Firestone would be delighted and astonished at how far his rubber has rolled.

Today speed is found on a screen before it is realized on a track.

A bit more work than a pitstop.

Relentless attention to details builds champions.

Takumo Sato’s suspension according A J Foyt’s brain trust.

20 Jun, 2017  |  Written by  |  under land speed racing, Motorsports


At St Clement Danes church in London on June 19th, 2017, we  sat silently in the pews, and most said  farewell to an Air Commodore of the Royal Air Force, but for me it was  “Vaya Con Dios Desert Witch.”

Out of uniform, she was simply, wonderfully a loyal friend, with which to drink copious quantities of champagne, and explore some beach, woodland, or castle when we were not on some crazy adventure out on the Bonneville Salt Flats.

In September 1997, it was a rag tag bunch of dirty Brits I met on the Black Rock Desert. It was not their fault, even the Queen would look like a bag lady after a few hours out there where the dirt particles measured out at one micron and got into everything whilst sticking out its miserable tongue at any filter, or barrier put in its way.

It was that alkali plain, a frontier remnant tucked into the northwest corner of Nevada where the British ThrustSSC team brought its 54-foot black jet car that looked more like comical, super-sized binoculars than a supersonic speed machine. It promised to be quite a show trying to get those 10 ton rolling field glasses to behave at Mach 1 whilst gulping down 125 gallons of fuel per mile and covering a mile every four seconds.

Led the bombastic force of nature better known as Richard Noble, ThrustSSC came to do supersonic battle with five-time World Record champ Craig Breedlove and his gleaming white Spirit of America, version 3. The smart money was on Breedlove, not Noble’s twin-engine beast.

I was a photojournalist on assignment for Sports Illustrated, and more than a dozen major newspapers and magazines that represented a combined readership of some 15 million.

I didn’t know any of the green-shirts from over the pond. Fortunately, being married to Brit, I knew it would be hard for them to pass up a bar after a hard day’s work, so that’s where I ambushed ’em. Buy a drink, get a quote. Worked a charm.

That’s how I met Jayne the Desert Witch, a strawberry blond who carried herself with quiet grace of one duty bound. As the team’s crack communicator, she juggled, if I recall correctly, at least 6 different radios that communicated with not only the biological unit, aka the driver, but a bevy of SSC crew spread out around the desert attending to the car and its safe operation.

Officially the ThrustSSC Run Controller, Jayne will forever be fondly remembered as the “The Voice of Black Rock” by anyone who ventured out to that forsaken arid wasteland hoping to witness a hard mark in the historical time line.

She discovered that hundreds of curious speed junkies were scattered throughout the desert perimeter watching with rapt anticipation for any high-speed movement. The trouble was there was no radio coverage, this was “Nowheresville, USA” where confusion and frustration ruled the day. The situation gave rise to some mighty fantastic rumors and misinformation.

And here is where I got my first lesson about what Wendy Jayne Millington was made of – she managed to get a hold of the scanner, and citizen’s band (CB) frequency’s used by most all spectators, and took it upon herself to broadcast run updates several times a day from her shipping container turned communications HQ.

It wasn’t long before that voice was beloved by all who heard her clear, concise reports. Rumors came to a screeching halt – if Jayne hadn’t said it, it probably wasn’t true.

Know this: when THRUST SSC earned absolute speed bragging rights after recording a Mach 1.02/763mph average on Oct 15th, some of that success tracked directly back to her.

Spectators made a poster-sized thank you card that they circulated up and down the perimeter road getting signatures and comments of gratitude. It was formally presented – where else? In a bar. Jayne was touched.

She kindly spent a great deal of time answering my many probing questions unruffled giving me clear perspective of her role and team’s missions goals. No umbrella girl here, this gal had skin in the game.

Jayne was in. All in. You couldn’t pull her focus anymore than you could slide Velcro sideways. I managed to get access to that metal box she sat in during a run and marveled at her deliberate, controlled execution of radio communication as she picked up, transmitted and went onto the next microphone with the next report, or instructions. All the while re-positioning the many little magnets on the board next to her that kept track of who and what was where. Call her a one-woman ATC.

When the team went home, Jayne and I kept our friendship going with many a visit back and forth over the next 20 years. I watched and marveled as she steadily rose in rank to Air Commodore, a very cool title that I had to research to figure out its equivalent in the USAF.

When she was the big boss of RAF Boulmer in Northumberland, she gave me a tour of the facility that essentially kept all of the UK skies safe from threat. The underground warren of technology and battle readiness was concurrently overwhelming and comforting. Lets just say, the UK airspace was rather good and safe when Jayne was in charge of Boulmer’s 1,100 staff. You sleep better knowing how many folks are on duty keeping an eye on the skies for bad guys – in the UK and in the USA.

On base, Jayne gave me a halting, nasty frown when I burst into laughter as airmen and women stopped in mechanical mid-step to salute the car we were riding in – complete with little fluttering flags atop the headlamps. I apologized, but reminded her that while she had been saluted for years, this was first for me. All was well when I bought a bottle of “champers” that turned into 3 before the weekend was done.

Her RAF call sign was “Desert Witch,” yet she anything but. Immaculately presented, impeccably polite and eloquent, Jayne was very much a RAF officer, devoted to the job and the people under her command.

Throughout the week, this civilian observed that she earned the respect, never demanded it. And at the grand dinner replete with white table cloths, silver, trophies, port and madera, the girl was every inch saluting material.

She managed RAF Boulmer while it was in great military and political upheaval, which she took in stride, and kept it mighty tidy amidst a maelstrom of change, challenge and chaffing. RAF Boulmer today has Jayne’s fingerprints all over it.

I will be forever grateful to her for the full day tour deep down in the bunker of the tremendous radar facility with ginormous huge, whopping thick steel doors, where they had a “bat phone” hotline to tactical air squadrons. When they let me scramble jets — got to push the button that unleashed holy hell – it was right up there with hanging out with the Martian Rover guys at JPL.

We spent a lot of time walking on the beaches and visiting Dunstanburgh Castle—one of her absolute favorite places on the coastline. We picked wild onions along the beaches and I made fine french onion soup back at her dandy fine digs while she introduced me to kippers.

When Jayne came over to the states, we would often go to Bonneville, or hang out in some grand spot for a few days of socializing. On one road trip from southern California to Bonneville as pit crew for Charles Burnett III who was sorting his land speed licenses in advance of his steam car world record attempt. Trundling through Nevada in a 30-foot motorhome, on a whim, we diverted to the “Extraterrestrial Highway,” aka Area 51.

Jayne had filled the long miles with stories of Red Flag exercises where she had been the RAF lead at Nellis AFB. The “mission” is cooperation among various nations teaching their fliers to play nice with each other in the sky and practicing various battle maneuvers that included lighted tracer dummy bullets.

Parked on the side of the Alien Inn in Rachel, Nevada, for the evening, we met a variety of UFO enthusiasts who proceeded to tell us – with rapt gusto – all about the weird lights in the sky we might get to see.

Jayne was all poker face, but I nearly spit out my Pinot Noir when the guy yells in his best too-tight knicker voice, “See, see, there they are, the aliens are back.”

Of course, it was another Red Flag gig overhead, but who were we to spoil the fantasy?

The next day I was determined to “see” Area 51 for myself and drove that big box coach across scrub desert, up and over hills into the mountain. A pair of stern faced Airmen in a battle-ready camouflaged Hummer stopped us. Jayne was amazed that I could drive the rolling box just as well in reverse and almost as fast. I figured it was best not to get jailed as she’d might have a harder time explaining things than I would.

A few years later, when Jayne the Air Surveillance and Control System Force Commander for the whole of the UK, she once more was responsible for a near fatal wine breach. I was watching the local news on TV at home in California when the anchorwoman starts rolling footage of the London Olympics reporting that rockets were being installed on roofs throughout the city as a safety precaution.

I will give you one guess who did that. When I called her the next day, Jayne was non-nonchalant about the whole thing saying, “I got the idea from you lot in Atlanta.

Of all the military ThrustSSC folks, she is the only one I know that was formally presented to Queen Elizabeth for her remarkable, enduring military service to the commonwealth. A big day for a little girl from Chester.

Every blessed Christmas there arrived the card from Jayne with “Do not open until the 25th” It was how I learned about Heifer International, a charity devoted to ending hunger and poverty that provides needy folks with all manner of farm animals in order to allow them to be self-sufficient. I figure through the years she donated a barnyard full in my name and I now do the same each year for my dear ones.

What started as a bad cough last October, grew more wicked and menacing until the doctors ran out of ideas about how to stop the unrelenting barrage of cancer cells. A resolute spirit who gave a fine accounting of herself in every regard, I salute her and offer this missive a way to grieve, to share a bit about a gal who loved speed attempts just as much I do.

Farewell, Desert Witch

“LandSpeed” Louise

 

Legal Notice: All images herein copyright held by Louise Ann Noeth 2017

May 29, 2017 – Speedway, IN – Winners of the All American Racing Writers & Broadcasters Association National Competition were announced just prior to the 100th running of the Indy500. Entries were judged “blind,” no judge was aware of the writer or where the work was published. The works sent for judging were published in the 2016 calendar year.

FIRST | Magazine Feature Writing | New Age: Powering Today’s Youth Market | PRI Magazine AUG 2016

AUG2016_Youth_PRI

FIRST | Magazine Column Writing | Law & Order: Inside Rulemaking | PRI Magazine April 2016

APR2016_Rules_PRI

FIRST | Photography – People | “Oh No, Not Again” | www.powerperformancenews.com
FIRST | Photography – Print Action | “Velocity Victory: Don Vesco Sets World Record” | 
Position Paper for Save the Salt and Utah Alliance

SECOND | Online – Feature Report | “Slower Going at this Year’s Bonneville Speed Week” |  www.hemmings.com

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/?p=712282

SECOND |Photography – Action | “How to Shred a “Chute North of 375MPH” | www.hemmings.com

https://www.hemmings.com/blog/?p=712282

THIRD | Online – Technical Report | “Supersonic Truth Telling” | www.theengineer.co.uk

https://www.theengineer.co.uk/land-speed-record-progress-from-before-computers-to-after-digitisation/

“There are serious in-roads being made to encourage children to consider motorsports as a career, in addition to simple enthusiasm,” said Noeth providing background on the work. “Those who made it to the top recognize the difficulties made all the more tougher without basic guidelines. That is changing, and youngsters are getting practical help. Rule making is a thankless, essential job from which racers would derive more benefit by simply contributing to the process.

At Bonneville, its hard NOT to get a great shot, but its all for naught unless you can share the moment with other eyeballs. This girl is very grateful to Shawn Brereton at Xceleration Media Group and Dan Strohl at Hemmings for the space and recognizing the hard-charging amateur racers. The cover shot of the late Don Vesco has sadly come to represent the last time land speed racers had a safe, long course upon which to race. At the time, it wasn’t the type of history I figured that I would be recording. The exuberance of the moment is steadily morphing into speed eulogy for the beloved international speedway. ”

The American Auto Racing Writers & Broadcasters Association (AARWBA) is the oldest and largest organization devoted to auto racing coverage. Founded in 1955 in Indianapolis, AARWBA has members throughout the United States, Canada and Europe.

To encourage excellence in the coverage of motor sports, AARWBA media members submit their best work for the annual media contest. Categories are for written, broadcast, online and photographic work. Winners present a true testament to the growth of the sport of auto racing.

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In a break with tradition, the Lifetime Achievement Award, in the 2016 International Historic Motoring Awards, in association with Octane magazine and EFG private bank, went to a place and the events held there, rather than to a person. At a glittering gala dinner at London’s magnificent Guildhall, the highest accolade of the evening went to America’s Bonneville Salt Flats Land Speed Racing, in tribute to over 100 years of inspirational achievements in a unique location. The award is sponsored by Richard Mille.

Octaihma-logone Publishing Director Geoff Love explained: “For over a century the Bonneville Salt Flats have been the scene of innumerable speed record attempts. We all know of the successes there of George Eyston, John Cobb and Al Teague for example, but everybody from car and tyre manufacturers to college students with trucks powered by used vegetable oil have traveled to this vast expanse of land to try to set their own records. No other place has inspired so many people to such a level, and this award goes to the place itself and to all of those enthusiasts who have endeavored to take a minute, a second or a fraction of a second off a speed record there.”

Originally nominated by “LandSpeed” Louise Ann Noeth in the “Motorsport of the Year” category, the IHMA Judging Panel recognized the dire ecological plight facing amateur racing brought about by decades of BLM mismanagement that allowed the once five-foot thick, concrete hard salt crust to wither to an almost paper thin layer less than a half-inch in many places and elevated Bonneville to the group’s most prestigious honor.

bsf-surface-changeWe may well witness the end of land speed racing on the Bonneville Salt Flats in our lifetime,” warned Noeth, the acknowledged LSR author and historical expert. “Racing returned in 2016 after two years of rainouts that diluted the fragile crust to a point that many of the plus 300MPH speed machines chose to pack up and go home instead of risking a wreck. I am so very grateful for the recognition spotlight the IHMA has cast upon the home of so many extraordinary speed deeds by ordinary people.”

Celebrating ‘the best of the best’ in the international historic motoring industry, the Guildhall saw the great and the good of the industry come together from around the world to discover who had won the hotly-contested awards.

For a full list of category winners: www.historicmotoringawards.com.

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